1837 Tables of Population for Kings County, Long Island (Brooklyn)

Here’s what I learned about Weeksville today, October 28, 2017:

In many cases, Weeksville descendants can trace their ancestry back to the 1830s or earlier: the days when Brooklyn was just one of many villages scattered about Long Island. I’m aware that black residents made up just a small part of the population then, but what did that mean? What was it like to be part of such a small population? This issue of the Colored American, published March 31, 1837, gives us some clues about the challenges of being “thinly scattered over the country in small communities.”

 

 

It is well known that the people of color being thinly scattered over the country in small communities, remote from and unknown to each other, without any common channel or medium of communication between them has operated to their disadvantage…

“Now the publication of the Colored American will open such a channel for the interchange of thought and feeling among them.”

 

Nearly 2,000 people in the city of Brooklyn, but what do the other columns mean? Only 10 people have taxable property? Which somehow translates to 30 votes?

Brooklyn population ca. 1837. 23,404 white; 1,196 people of color.

 

 

 

 

 

click on this image to see the full page. see link below for the full issue.

 

click here to see the full issue of the Colored American, dated March 31, 1837.

click here to learn more about the Colored American newspaper, also known as the Weekly Advocate, published 1837-1841. Samuel Cornish, editor.

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